Types of Wood Siding Available for Homeowners

When building your home, even the smallest decision could make a world of difference in what it ultimately looks like. This is also true when undertaking an exterior redesign project. Siding, among other key characteristics, is one of those big decisions that could entirely alter your home’s exterior appeal based on your decision.
Although plastic siding has become a popular option in recent years due to pricing, traditional wood siding remains the preference for many homeowners. This is because wood siding offers customers numerous benefits over their plastic counterparts. Benefits include:

• Wood siding is eco-friendlier than plastic

• Wood is more aesthetically appealing

• Many types of wood are naturally resistant to mold, mildew, and rot, which allows the home owner less maintenance

• Wood lasts longer

• …And much more

One of the main benefits is that wood naturally takes to paint, stains, and other decorative options incredibly well. Plastic, on the other hand, often must be crafted in the customer’s color choice – meaning that options are limited. Once decided upon a type of wood siding, however, you can then choose any type of finish. Whether you want to paint your home the colors of the rainbow, or opt for a natural dark wood stain, anything is possible. Below we look at four of the most commonly used types of siding available: board and batten siding, bevel, tongue and groove, and lap siding. Each has their own aesthetic appeal so that there is something for every person’s unique tastes.

Board and Batten Siding

Board and batten siding is a vertical design created by using two different sized boards. The wider boards are set beneath, while the narrower boards are placed atop the joins. These narrower boards are called ‘battens.’ There are no set widths, so homeowners can choose their preference. The most commonly used measurements, however, are 1 inch by 3 inch battens placed over 1 inch by 10 inch boards.

Bevel Siding

Bevel siding is the most commonly used siding. Installed horizontally, boards are cut at an angle so that one side is thicker than the others. This creates a shingle effect, or the appearance that the boards are overlapping one another. Tongue and Groove Siding Tongue and groove siding is incredibly versatile. Available in both rough and smooth board finishes, it is fitted together tightly to give a sleek appearance. It can be installed in any direction, which does not only include horizontal and vertical, but also diagonal.

Lap Siding

Lap Siding is also known as Channel siding. This siding is very versatile, with installation capabilities for any direction (like the above tongue and groove siding). This unique siding features boards which partially overlap one another, and the ultimate results are a rustic appearance like those of a hunting cabin. If you’re interested in learning even more about wood siding -including less commonly used types available – you can contact your local siding specialist or construction expert. They will be able to give you more detailed information, including a price estimate for your area.

Adding Value to Your Home with A Sunroom

Regardless of where you live, it’s likely that you want to make the most of your home’s outdoor space. Intense climates with scorching summers and freezing winters make it difficult to enjoy being outside. In addition to weather, mosquitos, flies and other pests often send people right back indoors. People are looking for ways to enjoy being outside without its nuisances. Sunrooms are an excellent solution.
The addition of a sunroom to Tennessee homes creates a middle ground between being indoors and outdoors. Though there are variations of each, the two main types of sunrooms are those with glass-paned walls and those with screened walls. Both sun and screen rooms allow you to be outside while offering you varying amounts of protection from insects and weather.

Screen rooms are the most basic and inexpensive form of a sunroom. Built onto decks or porches, the walls of a screen room protect people from insects and other pests. An enclosed roof offers shade from the sun and a cover from the rain, but for the most part, screen rooms are subject to temperatures and weather. While they can’t be temperature controlled, screen rooms can come with electricity for lighting and ceiling fans. Screen rooms are most enjoyed when the weather is comfortable.

Stepping up from a screen room, a traditional glass paned sunroom offers considerably more. Basic sunrooms provide protection from rain, snow and wind and increased protection from temperature. Electricity for ceiling fans and lighting are available as well as full temperature control for higher-end models. Because they are less subject to weather, sunrooms can be enjoyed during more parts of the year.

Like a typical room addition, sunrooms near Knoxville are a construction project. Before anything can begin, a plan must be made and building permits obtained. Once that’s in order, a foundation can be laid, walls put up and roof placed on top. With the installation completed, sun and screen rooms become a permanent addition to a home.

Whether you opt for a simple screened version or an advanced glass paned one, sunrooms are a great addition to any home. Every sunroom adds valuable and usable living space to a home. Sunrooms make excellent home offices, game rooms or art studios. The natural light of the sun with protection from insects and weather make sunrooms the perfect place to entertain guests, enjoy breakfast, or simply kick back relax.

Why I Love American Roulette

I bet you won’t agree with me when I say this – I love American roulette.

When I go on a casino trip, I head immediately for double-zero roulette games.

I’ve long been a defender of this casino classic.

After all, I’m an American.

So what is it about double-zero roulette that gets me excited?

First – an explanation of the main difference between American and European game rules.

American vs. European Roulette
The most important difference between American and European rules roulette is the number of spaces in the wheel where the ball might land. American wheels have 38 slots (1-36 plus one green zero and one green double-zero space) and European wheels have 37 slots (1-36 plus one green zero space).

The impact this extra space has on the American game’s odds is pretty significant. All wagers on American roulette games have a 5.26% house edge – while all wagers on single-zero games have a 2.7% house edge. The house edge on the American game is almost double that for single-zero or European tables.

But wait – I haven’t told you the whole story yet. True European roulette games include a special rule that reduces the house’s edge even more in certain game situations. At Euro tables, if the ball lands in the green zero space, bettors get half their wager back. With that rule in place, all even-money bets have a house edge of just 1.3%. Those are excellent odds by anyone’s definition, right?

So why do I love American roulette so much?

It’s Accessible
Only seven Las Vegas casinos host a single-zero roulette game. The Palazzo and the Venetian are the only two that host true American rules roulette – the other five have one European rules table each.

If you don’t do your gambling in Las Vegas, rest assured that your Euro game options are limited, too. The few Atlantic City casinos still in business aren’t eager to hand out money with low-odds games taking up floor space – I don’t know a single AC casino offering single-zero tables outside of a VIP room. You won’t find any single-zero tables in any property in Mississippi or Louisiana that’s run by one of the major operators like Harrah’s. Basically, if you’re in America, American rules games are by far the most common and the most budget-friendly. You may not even have the option of playing single-zero games, especially if you aren’t a high roller.

It’s Familiar
Because I’ve lived my entire life in the United States, I’ve only ever really known or played the single-zero game. I remember getting a casino play-set when I was a kid (with playing cards, a plastic roulette wheel, a ball bearing, some poker chips, and a set of dice), and sure enough, that game’s wheel was set up in imitation of good old USA rules.

I admit – the rules of European roulette are a lot better for the player. The “en prison” rule (the one that will pay you back half your even-money wager on a zero result) is so popular that a few casinos in America adapted it for use on double-zero wheels. Unfortunately, that game never caught on, probably because it cut the house’s edge from 5.26% to 2.63%. I also appreciate that the stupid “five numbers” bet isn’t available on single zero tables – I think that’s a terrible move by the casino to cheat ignorant people out of their money, and I wish it wasn’t available in American games.

But it all comes down to familiarity, for me. When I play the game, I expect a wheel with two green zero spaces. I don’t expect to get half my wager back thanks to “imprisonment rules.” I grew up risking way more of money than you can risk on European tables, and it’s just not familiar to me.

It’s Affordable
If single-zero roulette offers way better odds, why shouldn’t I just stick to those seven casinos when I visit Vegas? Because the vast majority of those single-zero games are in the VIP rooms, with $100 bet minimums. The most affordable single-zero games in town are at the Mirage, and the MGM Grand, where you can play on a single-zero table for a $25 minimum bet.

Most of the American-style roulette games in Las Vegas allow me to bet $5 or $10 per spin. Basically, I can’t afford to play singe-zero roulette. I’m used to seeing about one outcome per minute at a full Las Vegas table – if I wanted to step up to the VIP games, I’d be betting my mortgage four times over each hour. That’s not the kind of action that I (or my wife) can live with. Heck, it’s expensive enough at $600 an hour.

Atlantic City casinos hosted single-zero games years before Las Vegas did – at a time when Atlantic City gambling houses were playgrounds for the well-to-do. In America, European-anything is code for elite and uppity, and that seems to be the case with this European import. Though I consider myself an intellectual, someone able to overcome the trappings of his cultural heritage, I still can’t help but see the double-zero game as comfortable and familiar.

Conclusion
How little do casinos want Americans to play on single-zero wheels? It’s common for online casinos to restrict bets on Euro roulette from counting towards bonus requirements or loyalty points. The tables are practically gone from US casino floors. When you can find them, they’re restricted by high betting minimums or by requiring special permission to enter the VIP room where the games are kept. For all those reasons, I much prefer to play American-rules roulette games. I’m hoping that, after reading this, a few of you will feel the same way, and give the game a second chance.